Monotypes

A little about my history in image making…

I recall a rainy day at my Aunt’s house with my four boisterous cousins when I was in the early stages of elementary school. My aunt provided the 5 of us with crayons and paper and suggested we make drawings. I was the youngest of the 5 of us but somehow I managed to create a decent drawing and my aunt praised my drawing as the best of the group. Positive feedback inspired me forward in experiment with drawing and eventually by late elementary school, photography. In 5th grade, I entered some color photographs from a trip to Washington D.C., and won 1st place at the county fair.

I was very fortunate to attend a 2ndary school that had an excellent art program and continue to take art classes. I became very proficient at drawing representation busts predominantly older male models. I compiled a portfolio of drawings in high school and applied to art colleges and was accepted to a very prestigious program.

I decided to go to a liberal arts college and study art, art history, and philosophy.

After the undergraduate dual major left me wanting, I desired to study art at a graduate school level with a dedicated focus on art practice. While in graduate school I became involved with printmaking and somehow got a position working with a master fine art lithographer working on projects for the Dekoongings (Elaine and Willem), Motherwell, and Frank Stella.

During my latter phases of graduate school, I started applying intaglio inks on plates with a variety of instruments and techniques quickly. This process forced spontaneity and the element of the “accidental” into my image-making process and left behind the idea of rendering. What came forth was a discovery or an unfolding of, “something of interest”. For me, this was a truly liberating type of image-making practice.

This curated series of monoprints represents the beginnings of my exploration of the grid with organic forms. In some images, the grid and form are interwoven, in others the form becomes ghostlike, and the grid almost overrides it altogether. Alternatively, in some prints the form overtakes the grid, becoming a line, then an edge, and finally disappearing altogether. All monoprints are approximately 16 x 20 inches or 20 x 16 inches, depending on orientation. (1986-1989)

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